Deep green  pastures in November,

Due to spreading chicken manure in September, suggests the emerald island of Ireland.

These verdant pastures will provide welcome nutrition to lactating cows well into the winter, despite lack of rain in August and September. I had been aiming to graze into February, but lack of timely moisture probably means grass will expire by early January. We will keep you posted.

The picture below on the right, of the laneway, where we did not fertilize, shows fescue turning yellow, as we have often witnessed in the past. With growing cattle numbers, our pastures are steadily improving, due to trampling effect and high concentrations of dung and urine. We are seeing fewer yellow areas at this time of year than in the past.

Steers are fattening on sweetened fescue, now that hard frost has arrived. The red steer on the left and the two on the right are two-year-olds, ready to be harvested. Yearling calves stand in the background.

Should you be wanting chili or Moroccan sliders for the holidays, let us know in advance, so we can meet your needs. The chili is made from grassfed beef and lamb, along with organic tomatoes, beans, and hominy. It is a balanced meal in itself and only requires defrosting and heating up. You can't miss, and it is excellent! One could enjoy this chili every day of the week, without tiring of it.

We will be at the Winter's Farmers Market in Hyde Park at Clark Montessori this Sunday from 10 - 1. We also offer online ordering at: http://grassrootsfoods.biz/on-line-purchasing, for delivery this Wednesday the 12th at the corner of Pape & Bellecrest Avenues. In addition, we have product at Keegans Seafood on Hyde Park Square.

In service to you,

Drausin & Susan

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