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GRASSROOTS FARM


SOULFUL,
HEALTHY & DELICIOUS

Grass-based food you can trust, for you, your children, and grandchildren.

 

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GRASSROOTS FARM


SOULFUL,
HEALTHY & DELICIOUS

Grass-based food you can trust, for you, your children, and grandchildren.

 

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WHY GRASSFED


WHY GRASSFED?

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WHY GRASSFED


WHY GRASSFED?

 
 
 

Tastes Better

Our Katahdin Lamb is tender and has a light, sweet flavor. This lamb comes from “hair” sheep which do not have a musty, gamey flavor typical of many wool breeds and grain-fed sheep.

Our Red Devon Beef fatten well on grass. Their tender meat offers a more subtle flavor than grain-fed beef, is easier to digest, and carries the essence of pasture and soil.

Our Cornish Cross Chickens are moved twice a day to fresh grass, enhancing their dense meat and rich taste.  

Our Berkshire Hogs enjoy the nuts and shade of rotated woodlots, making for smooth and buttery meat.

 
 
 

FRESH PASTURE

We move livestock to fresh pasture every one to three days. Herds of beef and flocks of sheep are never fed corn, nor are they given routine antibiotics or hormones. Their diet consists of legumes, warm and cool-season grasses, and forbs, as well as mineral provided by kelp and sea salt. The constant movement of livestock mimics that of wild buffalo herds, which benefits pastures by allowing them to rest for a period of sixty days or more. Meat-chickens and laying-hens receive a ration of non-GMO grain, while grazing pasture daily.

 
 
 

MORE NUTRITIOUS

Grass-fed foods are what our grandparents thrived on and our children deserve. Grass-fed foods contains higher nutrient value (Omega-Three Fatty Acids, conjugated linoleic acids, beta carotene, vitamins A + B, Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium) than feedlot beef and lamb, and they are lower in saturated fats and omega-six fatty acids. Nutrients in our meats do not come from a grain wagon, but from the sun, grasses, and soil of our land. Grassfed products are not exposed to herbicide residues; they are a cleaner and healthier food than grain-fed meats. For more information about nutritional benefits of grass-fed products, see: www.eatwild.com/basics.html

 
 
 

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND

Grass-fed foods generate a positive environmental impact, because they rely on the sun and grazing-management to grow, rather than on petrochemicals and fossil fuels. The grazing system we employ creates its own fertilizer by building organic matter in the soil. In doing so, it pulls carbon and water from the atmosphere and stores it in the ground, offsetting pollutants.  

 
 
 

RAISED LOCALLY

Grassroots Farm & Foods produces beef, lamb, pork, chicken, eggs, and prepared foods in Cynthiana, Ohio—approximately eighty-five miles east of Cincinnati, in the legendary and biodiverse Beech Flats of Pike County.  We operate independently from the industrial food system, delivering food directly to you. We invite you to visit this beautiful farm and develop an ongoing relationship with its animals, land, and people.

 

 
 
 
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WHO WE ARE


WHO WE ARE

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WHO WE ARE


WHO WE ARE

 
 

Our team is made up of a motley and dedicated crew of people and canines, but the core team is Drausin and Susan, with Brendan and Sarah providing invaluable support. Drausin has been the chief-cook-n-bottle-washer since 2008, when he chose to become a full-time grass farmer, leaving employ as a banker to do so. Susan is by week a country barrister in Batavia, Ohio, and provides astute cooking and marketing skills. Brendan and Sarah arrived in early 2015 having spent nine years on the Koinonia Farm in Americus, Georgia. Brendan manages the animals, one of whom is Bo, our lead border collie. We also employ five Maremma guard dogs to ward off coyotes. That’s our team—a hearty troop, committed to raising and delivering some of nature’s best food to your table!

 

 
 
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OUR HISTORY


ABOUT THE FARM

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OUR HISTORY


ABOUT THE FARM

 

OUR HISTORY

Grassroots Graziers LLC, dba Grassroots Farm & Foods, operates on Red Stone Farm in Cynthiana, Ohio in Pike County. The farm is 85 miles east of Cincinnati and 90 miles south of Columbus. Red Stone Farm includes 1150 acres that have been owned by the John Wulsin family since 1968.  Over the years, Red Stone Farm has seen numerous agricultural undertakings: barnlot hogs, cow-calf enterprise, stocker cattle, and row crops of corn and soybeans.

 

In the early 1990s, the Wulsin family made a commitment to support a grass-based enterprises in an effort to create sustainable business practices. Shortly thereafter, Red Stone began developing a New Zealand-style, seasonal, grass-based dairy on 300 acres. We laid underground water lines, planted row-crop fields to pasture, installed electric fencing, and built an open-sided, swing-10 herringbone milking parlor. We have grazed and milked dairy cows on this “dairy platform” for the past 20 years.

 

In 2008, Red Stone began converting another 200 acres of its tillable ground to pasture. We laid more underground water lines, sowed grass, limed fields, built fences, and introduced sheep and beef. This acreage is now leased to Grassroots Farm & Foods, owned by Drausin and Susan Wulsin, to produce grass-based foods.

 

Over the past 15 years, Red Stone Farm has also been developing a wetlands mitigation bank on the property. For more information, see www.redstonefarm.org.

 


Our Name

Grassroots Graziers LLC is our legal name. We chose it because it describes several important forces underlying the production of grass-fed, nutrient dense food.

 

First, the food we provide is reliant on the abundant and healthy roots of grass plants. Roots of grass plants grow when the aboveground portion is not grazed and then contracts and sloughs-off. When a plant is grazed by ruminant animals, such as cows, sheep, and buffalo, the sloughing-off of roots creates organic matter in the soil. It is upon these soils that the food of our civilization grows. As we depend on the roots of grass for soil that grows our food, grassroots stands in our name.

 

The second concept is the word, “grazier”. A grazier manages grazing animals, while a grazer is the animal itself. Graziers orchestrate the interaction between ruminant animals and grass plants to create rich soils that produce grass-fed meats and milk. One must become a skilled grazier to produce high quality, grass-fed food, and thus we include that word in our name as well.

 

Our logo depicts a grass plant both above and below the surface of the soil. We aim for more roots to exist below the surface than blades of grass above it. When we supplement this plant with free solar energy to catalyze it, ruminant animals to harvest it, and customers who value the food it generates, we have the making of a sustainable business model. The grass plant thus lies at the heart of our sustainability. We are proud to be graziers managing southern Ohio’s grassroots to produce healthy food from our farm for discerning customers. Hence, we employ the marketing name of Grassroots Farm & Foods to promote and deliver the product to you.

 

 

OUR Philosophy

 

Our goal is to improve the life of customers by:

 

1)Managing land holistically and stewarding grassfed animals.

2)Preparing nutritious, savory, convenient, and trustworthy foods.

3)Delivering such foods to families in neighborhoods.

 

This production system is solar-powered: the sun fuels growth of perennial grasses year after year to be harvested by ruminant animals. This form of production can be replicated and expanded without exhausting natural resources. Nature has perfected this model over the millennia, producing wild herds of grazers, numbering in the tens of millions, in North America, Africa, and Asia. We are emulating this model on our landbase.

 

Nobody influences our thinking more than Allan Savory. Making daily decisions on a farm that incorporates the fast-changing variables of people, land, animals, weather, markets, and money can be confounding to say the least. In order to maintain clear minds and steady emotions as we wrestle with these variables, we find guidance in the decision-making process articulated by Allan Savory in his seminal work: Holistic Management - A New Framework for Decision Making. Mr. Savory is an ecologist who grew up in Rhodesia and now divides his time between home bases in New Mexico and Zimbabwe. His goal is to restore health to rural lands through wise decision-making. This includes incorporating the values of local people with principles of ecology, management, and money. More information can be found at: www.savoryinstitute.com.

 

We also stand by the principles of “slow money” articulated by Woody Tasch in Inquiries into the Nature of Slow Money. Slow money places value on the benefits of economic activity beyond the standard rate of return on investment. Specific benefits emphasized are nonviolence and beauty. We believe grass-based food production achieves both financial and spiritual returns in a magnificent way.

 

We are devotees of Wendell Berry—the Kentucky poet, philosopher, and farmer—who articulates eloquently the conundrums and opportunities faced by contemporary agriculture. He is a clear advocate of: ecological rates of return, nonviolence, beauty, and affection, as cornerstones of economic activity.

 

Joel Salatin is a forceful voice for the production and marketing of grass-based foods.  His neighborhood-marketing strategy, through Metropolitan Buyers Clubs, a is a successful approach to developing a relationship-based business. We are grateful to him for his tireless example and inspiration.

 

Occasionally, people ask why lamb is expensive. It is because sheep are hard to raise. They are highly susceptible to predators, parasites, and feet infections. They are also a challenge to contain. To deal with these issues, we invest significant management, labor, and capital. But they are beautiful animals to work with and one can’t help loving them. The hard work is rewarded when one tastes the meat of these Kathadin sheep. It is an exalted food!

 

We care deeply about the land we manage, the animals we steward, the food we produce, and the customers we serve. It is a powerful thing to be forging the links in this chain of connection.